Internet Governance Meeting

In a month’s time, our management team will be heading to Barcelona in Spain to take part in the 63rd ICANN meeting from 20–25 October.

This should be a policy focused event, as this meeting includes a ‘High-Level Government Meeting (HLGM)’ section, which takes place every two years in the current ICANN schedule.

HLGMs reinforce the critical role that governments play in providing advice to the ICANN Board on public policy relating to the secure and stable functioning of the Domain Name System. They also give participants an opportunity to discuss at a very senior level the current public policy issues and challenges at ICANN.

We’ll also be meeting with colleagues from around the world who work primarily in the internet governance, domain name and DNS space.

As always, ICANN meetings are free to anyone with an interest, including invididuals, so if you are remotely interested in the inner workings of the internet, they provide a rare unfettered glimpse for anyone who wants to learn more. Join us if you can, or watch this blog for our post-meeting analysis and report.

WHOIS changes for GDPR

The European data protection authorities have expressed concern over the unlimited publication of personal data of domain name registrants in the WHOIS. Typically at the moment when you register a new domain name you are bombarded with marketing calls and emails for a week or more.

Starting this week, you’ll see that the data on WHOIS for domains owned by EEA registrants is getting masked. This masking process is automated, will be ongoing and will be completed across all relevant domains on the platform.

For all existing domain names, if either of the Registrant, Admin, Tech and/or Billing contacts is identified as being from the EU, we will mask the WHOIS output for that domain name with placeholder details in place of the users’ personal information (this service will be referred to as “GDPR WHOIS Protection”).

Here’s an example of how the changes will look on a typical .COM domain name:

gTLD masked WHOIS example
gTLD masked WHOIS example

Some domain extensions are using their own interpretation of the GDPR so there are varying levels of masking in these domains (.UK is such an example).

Nominet WHOIS post GDPR
Nominet WHOIS post GDPR

Also to note that: access to personal data of domain name registrants may be granted when such access is necessary for technical reasons such as for the facilitation of transfers, or for law enforcement when it is legally entitled to such access.

Domains that have a paid-for “Privacy Protection” service will still enjoy this service – it has the important difference that enquiries using the web form/email address given in the Privacy Protection on the WHOIS will be forwarded to the Registrant. This is not the case (nor possible) on the GDPR masked domains.

Generate a GDPR compliant Privacy Policy

If you have a website, it is your responsibility to ensure that you have a GDPR compliant Privacy Policy.

There are a few tools available in the market that can help you draft a GDPR compliant Privacy Policy and make it GDPR compliant at a minimal cost

There are lots of sites that can help you create your very own privacy policy document. However, it’s critical that you consider all of the things you want included in your policy. While most sites use standard templates, you’ll need to amend or edit such a template to satisfy all the needs of your business – don’t rely on the document generated automatically. If necessary (and it is recommended), you should seek legal advice and have a professional privacy policy created because having an incorrect privacy policy is as bad, if not worse, than not having one at all.

March SSL Offer

Avoid a Search Engine penalty with our March Offer

http://2020.sc/march2018
http://2020.sc/march2018

Google have confirmed they will begin penalising websites that are not using SSL later this year. This applies to all websites, even if they do not collect any user data. It’s therefore recommended that you purchase SSL for your website.

For the month of March 2018, 2020Media is offering a full SSL 12 month certificate from trusted authority Globalsign for the exclusive price of £32.50+vat (2 years for £65+vat).

Use the link below to apply for your new SSL certificate, or contact us.
The offer is not limited to one site, you can order as many new SSL certificates as you wish, and they can be for one or two years. Due to the terms of our arrangement with Globalsign to bring you this offer, renewals are not included in this offer.

http://2020.sc/march2018

What’s involved?

We aim to make it as easy as possible – we will take care of the application process, setting up SSL hosting, putting in a redirect from non-SSL to SSL on your site, and running updates on your code to convert links to SSL within the site.

Is it really necessary?

Of course the choice is up to you – if you are not taking bookings or collecting user data, then the risk of any problems is really very low. Google say they are taking this step because: “Aside from providing critical security and data integrity for both your websites and your users’ personal information, HTTPS is a requirement for many new browser features”.
So ultimately I believe we will see a global secure web in the next year or so. SSL authorities may see this as a chance to increase prices, so our advice is to act now and be part of the 50% of the web that is now using SSL

If you have any questions please get  in touch with us.