Decoupling WordPress from the Front End

A client wanted a decoupled, REST API-powered website with a React frontend and a WordPress backend. This case study by development agency Humanmade.com is great read.

In a traditional WordPress project, WordPress powers both the front-end (what the world sees) and the back-end (where the content is entered). However WordPress has fantastic tools built in so that this is not the only way it can be deployed. In this example, WordPress is used solely as a data collection and delivery method.

The wider team, such as the designer, front-end developer, CSS developer, and Node.js developer, were able to focus on their component parts.

Read more at: A decoupled, REST-API powered website for ustwo — Human Made

.scot promotion

“There is no denying the potency of Scotland’s brand – its castles, dramas, and scenery are world-famous, as well as Scotland’s progressive position in global affairs

Registering a .scot domain is the perfect way to showcase a Scottish connection.

From 1st November 2018 to 28th February 2019, 2020Media is offer a very special price for .scot domains of just £15+vat per domain for the first year.

Register your .scot today:

http://2020.sc/scot18

Why Choose .SCOT?

Boost your business’s online presence

Are you a Scottish business or selling Scottish products? 71% of Scottish consumers said they would prefer to buy from websites with a .scot domain. Switching to a .scot domain will boost your authenticity and help attract new customers.

Highlight your Scottish roots online

Show how your brand is associated with one of the most iconic, progressive and scenic countries in the world.

Get the perfect domain name

With more names available with .scot  as opposed to the crowded .com, .net and .co.uk domain extensions, you’ll be sure to find the perfect domain and email address to suit your needs.

If you have any questions please get  in touch with us.


Quote from: David C. Weinczok, CastleHunter.scot

Internet Governance Meeting

In a month’s time, our management team will be heading to Barcelona in Spain to take part in the 63rd ICANN meeting from 20–25 October.

This should be a policy focused event, as this meeting includes a ‘High-Level Government Meeting (HLGM)’ section, which takes place every two years in the current ICANN schedule.

HLGMs reinforce the critical role that governments play in providing advice to the ICANN Board on public policy relating to the secure and stable functioning of the Domain Name System. They also give participants an opportunity to discuss at a very senior level the current public policy issues and challenges at ICANN.

We’ll also be meeting with colleagues from around the world who work primarily in the internet governance, domain name and DNS space.

As always, ICANN meetings are free to anyone with an interest, including invididuals, so if you are remotely interested in the inner workings of the internet, they provide a rare unfettered glimpse for anyone who wants to learn more. Join us if you can, or watch this blog for our post-meeting analysis and report.

WHOIS changes for GDPR

The European data protection authorities have expressed concern over the unlimited publication of personal data of domain name registrants in the WHOIS. Typically at the moment when you register a new domain name you are bombarded with marketing calls and emails for a week or more.

Starting this week, you’ll see that the data on WHOIS for domains owned by EEA registrants is getting masked. This masking process is automated, will be ongoing and will be completed across all relevant domains on the platform.

For all existing domain names, if either of the Registrant, Admin, Tech and/or Billing contacts is identified as being from the EU, we will mask the WHOIS output for that domain name with placeholder details in place of the users’ personal information (this service will be referred to as “GDPR WHOIS Protection”).

Here’s an example of how the changes will look on a typical .COM domain name:

gTLD masked WHOIS example
gTLD masked WHOIS example

Some domain extensions are using their own interpretation of the GDPR so there are varying levels of masking in these domains (.UK is such an example).

Nominet WHOIS post GDPR
Nominet WHOIS post GDPR

Also to note that: access to personal data of domain name registrants may be granted when such access is necessary for technical reasons such as for the facilitation of transfers, or for law enforcement when it is legally entitled to such access.

Domains that have a paid-for “Privacy Protection” service will still enjoy this service – it has the important difference that enquiries using the web form/email address given in the Privacy Protection on the WHOIS will be forwarded to the Registrant. This is not the case (nor possible) on the GDPR masked domains.